Chianti is Calling

sangiovese1I love Chianti. I love everything about it. The region. The grapes. The aromas. And oh yes, the flavours. The incredible flavours. The reflection of the ruby red colour is truly a thing of beauty.

Chianti is the heart of Tuscany and Sangiovese, its star grape, is the soul. Eight million cases of Chianti  are produced each year.  The characteristic aromas of cherry, raspberry, plum, leather and tobacco can be heavenly.

I must admit, if I were forced to have but one grape varietal in my wine rack, it would be Sangiovese (but I would still cry over the others).

Some recent favourites:

Villa Cafaggio Chianti Classico Riserva 2009
Villa Cafaggio Chianti Classico Riserva 2009

Villa Cafaggio Chianti Classico Riserva 2009

I am starting out with the splurge this time because this time was so good, so smooth, so utterly perfect – I could have closed my eyes and been in Italy. It was the first bottle I opened after I returned home from Maine, and it made me miss the beach a little less. This is wine-making at its best. 100% Sangiovese grapes and scored an impressive 92 by Mr. Robert Parker’s peeps. $35.00 SAQ

 

 

Volpaia Chianti Classico 2010

Volpaia Chianti Classico 2010
Volpaia Chianti Classico 2010

The medium-bodied fruity wine also got a great nod from those with more refined palates than mine. I loved it. The cherry notes have a fruity finish. It is perfect Friday night wine to start your weekend. In fact, I plan to pick up another bottle this weekend. $24.95 LCBO

 

 

 

tenuta di treccianoTenuta de Trecciano Colli Senesi 2011

A respectable Chianti at the right price. It is a medium-bodied fruity wine for everyday sipping. Grown in the hills around Siena, you will recognize raspberry and currants. A nice easy drinking wine. $15.95 LCBO

Favourite Chiantis

If you have ever wondered what the difference is between a Chianti, Chianti Classico, or a Chianti Classico Riserva, here you go:

Chianti  – a minimum 75% Sangiovese grape and 25%  blend of other grapes that can come from anywhere in the Chianti region.

Chianti Classico – the largest of the seven sub-regions of Chianti. The percentage of Sangiovese jumps to at least 80%.. The minimum alcohol level is 12% with at least 7 months aging in oak.

Chianti Classico Riserva – same grape requirement as the Classico, but a Riserva must be at least 12.5% alcohol and aged 27 months.

Chianti Superiore DOCG – is produced with stricter guidelines than most Chiantis. The grapes can come from anywhere in the region except the Chianti Classico sub-zone and must be aged for a minimum of 9 months.

And then there is the..

The highly lauded and appreciated Brunello di Montacino, this King of Sangiovese could  technically bear the Chianti name as it is produced from a clone called Sangiovese Grosso. But it chose to Go Your Own Way, just  like the Fleetwood Mac song says..

And of course the wine often referred to as Baby Brunello, the Vino Nobile de Montepulciano of the Prungolo Gentile grape. Smooth, powerful and more affordable – it is one of my favourites.

Let us know if you have a Chianti favourite. I could spend years testing and tasting and never get tired of the adventure.

Wednesday Wine Picks

beach lisSummer is the time to throw the routine out of the window. Explore new tastes. If you are a red drinker, as I am, it’s a good time to sample a new white.  After my three-week digital detox at the beach, I returned to my favourite LCBO last weekend. Some of my old wine picks were gone and a whole lot of new potential picks moved in. I am thrilled to say some of the new releases are worth getting to know much better.

My whites of the week:

A Crisp Northern Italian WIne
A Crisp Northern Italian WIne

Bastianich Adrianico Friulano 2011 DOC

This wine is from Friuli, the northeastern most region of Italy famous for its whites. This one is fruity and medium bodied. Lemon, peaches and pears stand out and could pair nicely with a salty dish. According to the Bastianich Winery web site, the ideal pairing is proscuitto either on its own or in a pasta with light cream sauce.

$19.95

 

Spinyback Sauvignon Blanc, Nelson, South Island, New Zealand 2012 – Walmea Estates

A Classic New Zealand Specialty
A Classic New Zealand Specialty

You could almost smell this wine from inside the bottle. Highly aromatic and no mistaking this for anything but a New Zealand import. There is nothing subtle about the nose. An explosion of citrus and grass,  it makes you think you have just rolled in the cuttings of a freshly mowed lawn. It is crisp, crisp, crisp. Ideal if you like wine with a bite. But cautious Sauvignon B. lovers may well find it overwhelming. $18.95

 

 

Value Wine of the Week
Value Wine of the Week

Domaine de la Gitonniere, Touraine 2011 AC Value Alert!!

True confessions, I am enjoying a glass right now. The gentleman at Summerhill’s tasting room RAVED about it. At that price, I had to pick one up – and the only reason I picked just one was because I was on foot. It is much more subtle than Spinyback. More asparagus, grassy, and melon stand out. And it is lovely and smooth with a nice satisfying finish. I highly recommend this one, but don’t wait. I doubt it will last long on the shelves.. $13.95

 

M. Chapoutier Invitare Condrieu 2011, Rhone 

A Splurge-Worthy White
A Splurge-Worthy White

My return to the tasting bar meant I had to find a  white worth splurging on. This one was extremely worthy. Condrieu is so smooth, songs should be written about it. This one was elegant, balanced, rich, full-bodied, exotic. I might just dream of this wine. $65.95

 

No red you ask? What about a Canadian wine? I have to work my way back slowly, but I promise both will be featured prominently next week. There are so many great releases that need sampling!

Let us know if you have tasted something that’s worth a shout out!

 

Around The World; One Bottle At A Time

When it comes to wine, just like travel we all have our regular go to destination…each spring I visit a stretch of the Mayan Riviera that I just love and while there are definitely other great beaches in the world for some reason every year I return to same place.  It’s the same with wine, considering there is so much great wine from around the world I always seem to go back to the Italian ones.

0-1Trying to step out of my comfort zone this summer I decided I would take a trip around the world one bottle at a time via the wines offered up at my local liquor store.  Considering I live in the burbs the selection isn’t half bad.  My buggy was full and the total came to a tidy sum but I tried to make sure I kept to bottles under $20 so as not to break the bank because even for this adventure there was a budget.

I ended up with wines from Spain, Alsace, France, South Africa, Italy, California, Australia and even a couple of local ones from Ontario.  Some I loved, some not so much and others really surprised me when I wasn’t expecting them to. Here’s the ones that really surprised me and are worth taking a trip to the liquor store for.

0-3Red Guitar: Old Vine Trempranillo Garnach 2010 Navarra,Spain $12.95 (total steal) My husband and I were totally surprised by this one as we tend to shy away from Spanish wines.  I’m not sure why, as Spain is well known for some really great wine but usually I defer to Italy when it comes to full-bodied reds. This has a deep ruby colour and tasted of rich dried fruits and spices. It was terrific with the grilled t-bone steak and fingerling potatoes.  We both said we would definitely buy it again.

0-2Porcupine Ridge 2012 Syrah Swartland, South Africa $14.95 This comes from the boekenhoutskloof winery
and is named after the crested porcupines that live in the region. Tasting of blackberries, spices and vanilla it’s also a great match for grilled meats and we enjoyed it with pork tenderloin medallions, fingerling potatoes (these are my hubby’s favourites so they make the menu a lot), ripe tomatoes with a dash of olive oil, salt, pepper and some fresh basil.

0Willy Gisselbrecht Sylvaner 2011 Alsace $13.95 But it’s now on clearance for $10.25 so if you want to try it you’ll have to hurry.   This is a terrific full-bodied white wine that goes extremely well with seafood especially oysters.  Certainly not as appreciated as a Riesling which is definitely the most respected grape varietal from Alsace, a Sylvaner from a good producer can certainly hold it’s own.  It was cool and refreshing and as I’ve already searched the LCBO data base I’m going to my local store where they still have 6 bottles to pick up the rest.

Ascheri Barbera D’Alba $14.45 Piemonte, North West Italy this one was recommended by a friend who had it recommended to them by the sommelier who insisted it was a great go to wine if it’s on the wine list when you are out for dinner.  The first time I tried it I knew this would be something I’d have on hand in the cellar for those everyday occasions.  Made from 100% Barbera grapes which have now become the third most-planted red grape variety in Italy after Sangiovese and Montepulciano.  It’s medium bodied and amazing with pasta.

So take a chance because you never know what you’ll find and hey for under $20 you can barely get lunch at a fast food joint never mind a great bottle of wine to go with dinner.

Are you willing to take a chance and step out of your comfort zone?  If you find a great wine you’d like to share let us know.