Wine Songs: Grape Harmonies

Grape Inspiration
Grape Inspiration

There are so many ways to appreciate a good glass of wine. You can buy a case, tell a friend, and if you are a musician, write a song about it. How many songs can you think of with wine in the title?

The most bizarre, best known,with a title that makes me strangely sad:

Spill the Wine– Eric Burdon and War (1970)

According to Wikipedia – the inspiration came from Lonnie Jordan – founding member of the band War, who accidentally spilled a glass of wine all over the mixing board. Rock and Roll legend Eric Burdon thought it was so funny, he and Jordan wrote a song about it. That explains the Wine, but not the Gnome, which always made me think of Twin Peaks.

This title makes me happy:
Red, Red Wine – UB40 – (1984)

Neil Diamond wrote and performed this song lamenting a lost love by drowning his sorrows in red wine. It made it to number 62 on the Billboard Hot 100 Chart in 1968. UB40’s reggae-style version spun the tune to the top of the charts around the world, hitting number one in the US when it was re-released in 1988.

 

 

Days of Wine and Roses – Henry Mancini and Johnny Mercer (1962)

This song picked up an Oscar for best original song from the movie of the same name. It went on to be performed by greats Frank Sinatra and Andy Williams. The film was a brilliant and tragic tale of two average people whose lives are devastated by alcoholism. (ok, that’s a real downer for a wine blog – but the performances are truly incredible).

How deep is the love:

Poison and Wine – Civil Wars – 2009

This haunting tune by the fabulous Nashville duo John Paul White and Joy Williams looks at the good, the bad and the ugly of relationships (and I firmly believe the wine part = the good). I first heard it on an episode of Grey’s Anatomy. The song is on their album Barton Hollow which debuted as #1 on the ITunes Singer-Songwriter chart.

images

Cracklin’ Rosie –Neil Diamond – 1970

Wait a minute – I thought this song was about a spunky gal named Rosie or a store-bought love doll. Wrong! Cracklin’ Rosie is a bottle of cheap sparkling wine with a Canadian connection. This was Diamond’s first #1 hit and he got the idea from a folk tale about a native tribe in Northern Canada where the men far out-numbered the women (have you ever been to Fort McMurray?). The guys who didn’t get the girl on a Saturday night– got a bottle of Cracklin’ Rosie. Re-reading the lyrics with that in mind gives the song a whole new perspective.

“Cracklin’ Rose, get on board/ We’re gonna ride till there ain’t no more to go/ Taking it slow/ Lord, don’t you know/Have made me a time with a poor man’s lady”

Those are just some of the titles that hit the charts. Imagine how many wine-inspired tunes sounded great ….until the morning after.

Got another favourite wine title? Send it to us!

Mozart Makes the Vines Grow Stronger

A Rocking VintageThe connection between wine and music is a marriage made in heaven, not just because it is the combination of two of my favourites things, or even because I can’t imagine my life without either, but there is actually a science behind the power of this pairing.

Throw a little ACDC on the sound system and you might describe the red you are sipping as as punchy or bold, while those Pat Metheny tunes will have you calling a white wine  light and crisp. A study out of Herriot – Watt University in Edinburgh suggests the music you are listening to  affects the way it tastes and certain kinds of music will make the wine taste better.

Research out of the University of Leicester in the UK found that music can also  affect the kind of wine you buy. So  listening to Tony Bennett Leaving his Heart in San Francisco while shopping could lead you to a lovely Napa Valley red – while sultry French songstress  Edith Piaff could send you directly into the Bordeaux aisle.

There are web sites dedicated to music and wine pairings. WIneandMusic.com – tells us Katy Perry’s Teenage Dreams goes nicely with 7 Deadly Zins Zinfandel 2007, or Maroon 5’s Hands All Over is perfectly paired with d’Arenberg’s Stump Jump. The web site’s philosophy is “Wine is like music, you may not know what is good, but you know what you like.”

Seven Deadly Zins Suggested with Angelic Katy Perry

Another web site dedicated to harmonic pairings, WineFoodMood.com – combines beat of the music and wine style – so fast-paced and energetic tunes like Abba is best consumed with something easy drinking – like a Beaujolais. Most of the research focuses on how our wine decisions and appreciation are  influenced by music.

You don’t have to look far to see more evidence of the marriage of music and wine. For example, AC/DC Back in Black Shiraz, the Rolling Stones Forty Licks Merlot, or Sting’s Tuscan creation Sister Moon – clearly wine appreciation extends to all musical genres.

Wines That RockA Calfornia winery out of Mendocino County called  Wines that Rock produces Forty Licks Merlot and that’s just the beginning. Wines That Rock calls itself the official wine of rock and roll. Its mission: to  “create great tasting wines inspired by music.” http://www.winesthatrock.com/The-Wine. Pink Floyd’s Dark Side of the Moon Cabernet Sauvignon, Police’s Synchronicity Red Blend, Woodstock Chardonnay – the labels are amazing and the reviews pretty great, too.

According to the website,  winemaker Mark Beaman has music blasting through the cellar while working his magic. He even has playlists for harvesting (including U2, Smashing Pumpkins, Led Zepplin and Dire Straits) and for blending (Fleetwood Mac, Police, Pink Floyd and The Red Hot Chili Peppers).

A  small winery in Tuscany believes the love affair  goes both ways.. It uses the power of music to coax the best out of its grapes.

The Sound of Mozart in Paradise

Il Paradiso di Frassina plays Mozart to its vines 24 hours a day. Owner Giancarlo Cignozzi believed playing music to the vines would enhance their flavour – and make Giancarlo happy at the same time. A civil lawyer from Milan, he bought the vineyard in 1999 and brought his love of music with him.

Whether classical music makes the vines go stronger, or if it is merely a marketing tool, it is an effective one.  Il Paradiso has become known as the Mozart Vineyard. Every major wine publication along with the international media has come to call and to sample.

“We became known as the people who play music to the grapes. They thought we were nuts,” says Ulisse Cignozzi, Giancarlo’s son who gave us the tour.

The speaker people at BOSE believed enough to donate 100 speakers to the cause. The University of Florence took notice and is currently involved in a long term study to see if there is science to support the theory.  Ulisse says it’s too early to tell, but there are some initial findings that suggest the grapes respond to sound.

“We noted the sugar content is higher in grapes that are closer to the speakers,” he says.

One of the wines under the influence that we sampled, a Brunello di Montalcino 2007 was full-bodied and delicious. While I haven’t found it in the LCBO, Zoltan Szabo – sommelier at Toronto’s Trump International Hotel and Tower stocks it at the hotel.

Another wine, though not grown in the shadow of the speakers, accompanies the musical theme. 12 Uve (12 grapes) features 12 different varietals – 6 Italian, 6 Bordeaux – one for each note on the musical scale.

There’s no shortage of interest in the pairing of music and wine closer to home. Mount Royal University in Calgary offers a course in music and wine pairings. www.Mtroyal.ca

Jackson-Triggs holds a  spectacular concert series each summer, a perfect example of the harmonious blend of good music and good wine – www.jacksontriggswinery.com

The Outside Lands Festival near San Francisco even hired a wine curator to pair wines with the music performances on the menu.

“We’re creating a new platform where all these pleasure points in our life – eating, drinking and music,” curator Peter Eastlake told Wine Spectator earlier this year.

True, because there is nothing more pleasureable than a tasting a great glass of wine – at any price, while listening to the perfect piece of music.

Slainte (cheers in Gaellic – pronounced Slawn-tcha)